Processed Meat

Processed meat uses a variety of chemical and physical treatment methods to make lower grade meat more palatable. New processing methods have resulted in products that meet consumer demand for longer shelf life for processed meat. Contact us for a personalised recommendation.

Each country’s food authority approves various naturally derived colourings in cooked meat and poultry. Approved colouring must be heat stable, endure pasteurization (~ 80 degrees C), and should not change during exposure to light, oxygen or pH. Developers tend to formulate with caramel colour, carmine, turmeric and annatto. Some minced, pork-based products contain red beet (beetroot) for colour or flavor.

Meat Analogue

Meat analogue is also known as meat extender. Added protein may extend the content of higher-cost meat products to result in an overall, lower cost product to achieve necessary protein levels. A meat analogue may include added animal or plant proteins and use the same processing techniques. Meat analogs are also available as meat substitutes.

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Processed Poultry

In processed poultry -- whether bone-in, whole muscle, or mechanically separated -- regulatory authorities may allow for added colouring on the surface of cooked poultry.

Examples are breadings or coatings for wings, tenders, nuggets, or patties. Manufacturers use annatto, caramel colour, paprika and turmeric to create visual appeal.

Processors of cooked chicken and turkey tend to select the lightest caramel colours for yellow to golden surface tones. Applications include grilled, rotisserie, oven-roasted, honey-roasted, spice blends, marinades, or rubs.

Check out our Technical Tips for using natural colours and caramel colour in processed meats, poultry and fish. This document specifically reviews caramel colour in processed meat applications.